BAY ATLANTIC SYMPHONY RECEIVES GRANT FROM OCEANFIRST FOUNDATION


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BAY ATLANTIC SYMPHONY RECEIVES GRANT FROM OCEANFIRST FOUNDATION

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ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (August 19, 2019) — Bay Atlantic Symphony is proud to announce it is the recipient of OceanFirst Bank Foundation 2019 Arts & Cultural Grant in the amount of $1,500.00. The money will be used to continue the orchestra’s Music Mentorship Programs located in Atlantic City and Vineland schools. 

OceanFirst Bank representatives presented the check to Bay Atlantic Symphony Board President Thomas A. Giegerich, DMD, and Interim Executive Director Kathy Corbalis in the bank’s Galloway Branch office located at 320 E. Jimmie Leeds Road in Galloway, N.J. Pictured above from left to right are: Linda Calderon, Branch Manager; Nancy Wescoat, AVP/Area Business Development Officer/ Business Development; Thomas A. Giegerich; Kathy Corbalis; and Lana Latella, Vice President Government & Bankcard Services. 

Instituted in 2014, Bay Atlantic Symphony’s Music Mentorship Program provides free string and woodwind instrument lessons, as well as ongoing music education, for students in Atlantic City’s Sovereign Avenue School, Atlantic City High School and Vineland High School. This dynamic music education program has been created in cooperation with Stockton University and is also supported through generous donations from the Frank and Lydia Bergen Foundation and William and Virginia Gormley’s Atlantic City Friends of Music Foundation

The program pairs Bay Atlantic Symphony professional musicians, aided by music majors from Stockton University with elementary and high school students. Students enrolled in the Music Mentorship Program receive musical instruments, and several weeks of lessons during the academic year to include classes in basic and advanced technique on violin, viola, cello, flute, clarinet, and double bass. Lessons are taught in small groups and a one-to-one basis by Bay Atlantic’s professional string and woodwind musicians along with volunteer student-musicians from Stockton. 

“We’re both honored and grateful that OceanFirst Bank has recognized and is supporting the invaluable Music Mentorship program for school children provided by the Symphony,” stated Thomas A. Giegerich, DMD.  “We look forward to continuing the program for area students, who might not otherwise have the opportunity, to become proficient musicians and perhaps go on to a career in the performing arts.” 

The Bay Atlantic Symphony performs symphonic and chamber concerts and educates adults, young people, and special populations throughout southern New Jersey in the beauty and power of classical music. To learn more, visit www.BayAtlanticSymphony.org, call (609) 449-8780, or visit them on Facebook.

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Bay Atlantic Symphony Media Contact:

Fish With Feet, LLC
Cathleen Kiernan: 609.601.8379 
ckiernan@fishwithfeet.com 

A NIGHT IN VENICE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

A NIGHT IN VENICE, AN EVENING OF FINE FOOD & LIVE MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT PREVIEWS BAY ATLANTIC SYMPHONY’S 

2019/2020 CONCERT SEASON CELEBRATING ALL THINGS ITALIAN
A benefit for the Symphony, the event takes place
Saturday, Sept.
28, 2019 from 6 to 10 p.m.

BRIDGETON, N.J. (July 25, 2019) The Bay Atlantic Symphony will host an evening of fine food and live musical entertainment to preview the orchestra’s upcoming 2019/2020 Subscription Series Concert Season opener featuring Italian operatic classics.  A Night in Venice will be held Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019, from 6 to 10 p.m., at the Treborgarth Estate, One East Lake, located at 401 East Commerce St., Bridgeton, N.J. 

Hosted by Bay Atlantic Symphony Board Member Robert Dragotta on his century-old lake     front estate, A Night in Venice will feature action stations of Italian-inspired cuisine expertly paired with locally sourced wines.  Each of the event’s action stations will include live musical performances provided by professional musicians from Bay Atlantic Symphony, regional musicians from New York and Atlantic City, and Italian instrumentalists hailing from the Bridgeton area.  Guests can meander the property’s five acres of formal gardens, moving from one station to the next making for an evening of fun, frivolity and world-class entertainment featuring a range of Italian music from classical to gondolier songs and more.

As part of the event’s preview theme for Bay Atlantic Symphony’s 2019/2020 season-opening concert scheduled for Nov. 2 and 3, 2019, a stunning program showcasing Italian operatic classics and Puccini’s exquisite harmony and lyricism, each event guest will receive a Venetian mask to wear or hold for the evening.  Additionally attendees have the opportunity to be fitted for period costumes in advance to wear during the event. 

Event tickets are $100 per person available on a limited basis. For tickets, sponsorships or more information, contact Robert Dragotta, 917-860-1855, or visit: www.bayatlanticsymphony,com/a-night-in-venice

Event sponsors to date include: The Italian Cultural Foundation of Vineland; Dr. Thomas  Giegerich, DMD; Eastern Pacific Development LLC; Aaron Cohen; and Robert DiSanto. A Night in Venice is also made possible in part by a grant from The New Jersey Department of State – Division of Travel & Tourism.  

In addition to serving as the benefit kick-off celebration for the Symphony’s 2019/2020 Subscription Series Concert Season, Bay Atlantic Symphony is proud to announce their return to a familiar venue for their Cumberland County concert location.  All Symphony subscription Series Concert performances on Saturdays will be performed at the Guaracini Performing Arts Center, Rowan College of South Jersey – Cumberland Campus (formerly Cumberland County College). Sunday concert dates will still be performed at Stockton University’s Performing Arts Center (PAC).

“We’re so very pleased and honored to be returning to a concert venue that has been so beloved by our patrons, as well as serving as the official resident symphony orchestra for the Center,” stated Jed Gaylin music director and maestro for Bay Atlantic Symphony. “The acoustics in Guaracini Performing Arts Center are excellent and truly enrich the sound of our orchestra for a magical audience experience,” added Gaylin.   

About the Bay Atlantic Symphony

The Bay Atlantic Symphony performs symphonic and chamber concerts and educates adults, young people, and special populations throughout southern New Jersey in the beauty and power of classical music. 

Since its founding as the Bridgeton Symphony in 1983, the orchestra has been recognized for its world-class performers, diverse programs and outstanding community services. Under the talented baton of passionate Music Director Jed Gaylin, the Bay Atlantic Symphony is the only professional orchestra to serve the five southern most counties of New Jersey. The Orchestra makes great music accessible through live concerts with low ticket prices at the Stockton Performing Arts Center (PAC), the Guaracini Performing Arts Center, Rowan College of South Jersey-Cumberland Campus, the Avalon Symphony by the Sea Series, and the Cape May Music Festival. 

The Symphony’s value to the community goes far beyond performing great music. As a cultural centerpiece, the BAS is a treasured music education resource. By creating meaningful, interactive music experiences for children, adults, the visually-impaired, veterans, and seniors with limited mobility, the BAS strives to create vibrant communities rooted in the love of music. The New Jersey State Council on the Arts has honored Bay Atlantic Symphony with a 2019 Citation of Excellence, which denotes arts programs and projects that receive the Council’s highest possible assessment. To learn more, visit www.BayAtlanticSymphony.org, call (609) 449-8780, or visit them on Facebook.

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Bay Atlantic Symphony Media Contact:

Fish With Feet, LLC

Cathleen Kiernan: 609.601.8379 

ckiernan@fishwithfeet.com


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BAY ATLANTIC SYMPHONY ANNOUNCES 2019–2020 SEASON CONCERT SERIES


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BAY ATLANTIC SYMPHONY ANNOUNCES 2019–2020 SEASON CONCERT SERIES


Music Director Jed Gaylin leads the orchestra’s subscription series, November 2019 to May 2020, including a holiday music concert ensemble

 

ATLANTIC CITY, NJ (May 14, 2019) The Bay Atlantic Symphony announced today performances for the ensemble’s 2019–2020 concert season featuring such highlights as Italian operatic classics, a big choral collaboration, joyful holiday music, and internationally acclaimed soloists including pianist Terrence Wilson and guitar prodigy Junhong Kuang.

“This season, we will captivate audiences with passionate and magical musical journeys.  From an Italian opener filled with Puccini’s exquisite harmony and lyricism, to an autobiographical sketch of J. Kimo Williams’ Hawaiian childhood, from Rodrigo’s soulful guitar concerto, to Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4, audience members will be enthralled with the beauty and transcendence of each program,” said Jed Gaylin, Bay Atlantic Symphony Music Director.  

Below are the details for each of these unforgettable performances:

Nov. 2 and 3, 2019
Viva Rossini, Verdi, Bellini, e Puccini – Viva Italia! We are delighted to reconnect with and feature the Greater South Jersey Chorus and Artistic Director Dr. Chris Thomas, in Puccini's stunningly beautiful Messa di Gloria. With Min Jin's supplely rich tenor and Jason Widney’s expressively resonant baritone, this work is irresistible. What a celebratory way to open a season featuring some rollicking Rossini overtures! Performances are Saturday, November 2 at 3 p.m. at the Guaracini Performing Arts Center, Cumberland County College, Vineland, and Sunday, November 3 at 2 p.m. at the Stockton Performing Arts Center.

Dec. 7 and 8, 2019
Every family enjoys a holiday tradition, so let the Bay Atlantic Symphony become yours! During the holiday season, you’ll enjoy a concert of classical favorites including: Holst’s Saint Paul’s Suite, Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, Strauss’ Pizzicato Polka, and Russell Steinberg’s Light’s On! A Hanukkah Medley as well as Schubert’s Ave Maria, Adam’s O Holy Night with magnetic tenor Andrew Sauvageau and Harris’ A Medley of Christmas Carols. Plus, we’ll host two carol sing-alongs to conclude our concerts and a memorable holiday tradition. One is with the orchestra and the PNC Holiday Youth Chorus and the other gathered ’round the piano led by the Symphony’s maestro. Let’s trim the tree and spin the dreidel together! Performances are Saturday, December 7 at 3 p.m. at the Guaracini Performing Arts Center, Cumberland County College, Vineland, and Sunday, December 8 at 2 p.m. at the Stockton Performing Arts Center.

Jan. 18 and 19, 2020
Into the Liquid is a work of ravishing colors by American Composer J. Kimo Williams. Featured in this vibrant chamber orchestra concert are Concertmaster Ruotao Mao and Principal Second Violinist Genaro Medina in Bach's immortal Double Concerto.

We conclude the performance with a virtuosic work for the whole string section in Tchaikovsky's haunting Souvenir de Florence. Performances are Saturday, January 18 at 3 p.m. at the Guaracini Performing Arts Center, Cumberland County College, Vineland, and Sunday, January 19 at 2 p.m. at the Stockton Performing Arts Center.

March 21 and 22, 2020
Magic and shimmer abound in a program with Mendelssohn’s Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture, then the work of two Ravel classics, Pavane for a Dead Princess and Le Tombeau de Couperin. The concert closes with the mystery of Beethoven's lyrically spellbinding piano concerto, played by internationally renowned pianist Terrence Wilson. Otherworldly and divine! Performances are Saturday, March 21 at 3 p.m. at the Guaracini Performing Arts Center, Cumberland County College, Vineland, and Sunday, March 22 at 2 p.m. at the Stockton Performing Arts Center.

May 2 and 3, 2020
The Symphony’s season finale features music that speaks of the land. Whether it's Rodrigo's Zarabanda lejana y villancico or Concierto d’Aranjuez, the gutsy Bartok folk dances or Bizet's champagne-popping symphony of youthful abandon, this inviting concert will captivate you. So will magnificent 18-year-old guitar superstar Junhong Kuang. Performances are Saturday, May 2 at 3 p.m. at the Guaracini Performing Arts Center, Cumberland County College, Vineland, and Sunday, May 3 at 2 p.m. at the Stockton Performing Arts Center.

Ticket Information & Concert Locations
The 2019–2020 Season Subscription includes all five concert events for just $125, plus a $3 ticket service fee, thanks to the generous support of Woodruff Energy and PNC Arts Alive. Tickets are on sale now. The Guaracini Performing Arts Center is located at Cumberland County College, 3322 College Dr., Vineland, N.J. The Stockton Performing Arts Center (PAC) is located at Stockton University, 101 Vera King Ferris Dr., Galloway, N.J.

Subscriptions and tickets for the Guaracini Performing Arts Center can be purchased by calling Bay Atlantic Symphony offices at 609-449-8780, and Stockton University Box Office for PAC performances at 609-652-9000. Individual tickets for the Symphony’s 2019–2020 concert season will be available this summer.  Check www.Bayatlanticsymphony.org for the most up-to-date information!

 

About the Bay Atlantic Symphony

The Bay Atlantic Symphony performs symphonic and chamber concerts and educates adults, young people, and special populations throughout southern New Jersey in the beauty and power of classical music.

Since its founding as the Bridgeton Symphony in 1983, the orchestra has been recognized for its world-class performers, diverse programs and outstanding community services. Under the talented baton of passionate Music Director Jed Gaylin, the Bay Atlantic Symphony is the only professional orchestra to serve the five southern-most counties of New Jersey. The Orchestra makes great music accessible through live concerts with low ticket prices at the Stockton Performing Arts Center (PAC), the Guaracini Performing Arts Center, Cumberland County College in Vineland, the Avalon Symphony by the Sea Series, and the Cape May Music Festival.

The Symphony’s value to the community goes far beyond performing great music. As a cultural centerpiece, the BAS is a treasured music education resource. By creating meaningful, interactive music experiences for children, adults, the visually-impaired, veterans, and seniors with limited mobility, the BAS strives to create vibrant communities rooted in the love of music. The New Jersey State Council on the Arts has honored Bay Atlantic Symphony with a 2019 Citation of Excellence, which denotes arts programs and projects that receive the Council’s highest possible assessment. To learn more, visit www.BayAtlanticSymphony.org, call (609) 449-8780, or visit them on Facebook.

 

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Bay Atlantic Symphony Media Contact:
Fish With Feet, LLC
Cathleen Kiernan: 609.601.8379
ckiernan@fishwithfeet.com

Bay Atlantic Symphony Names Interim Executive Director


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Bay Atlantic Symphony Names Interim Executive Director


ATLANTIC CITY, NJ (April 10, 2019) — The Bay Atlantic Symphony Board of Trustees has appointed Kathleen J. Corbalis, APR, of Galloway Twp., N.J., as the symphony’s interim executive director.

In her new role, Corbalis will manage the financial and institutional development of the forward-looking arts organization. She will partner with Music Director Jed Gaylin to implement the strategic and artistic vision of the symphony.

With more than 30 years of experience in non-profit public relations, marketing and fundraising, Corbalis is fervent about the symphony’s mission of bringing music education and concerts to members of the southern New Jersey community. The award-winning communicator will use expertise garnered from her 30-year tenure as executive director of college relations at Atlantic Cape Community College, where she founded and operated a long-running contemporary folk music series. She also served as the project manager and social media manager for the National Council for Marketing and Public Relations (NCMPR) and president of Kathleen Corbalis Communications, where she focused on higher education, non-profits and fine arts.

As a community advocate, Corbalis is a long-time member and former chairperson of the Community FoodBank of New Jersey – Southern Branch Advisory Board as well as Scholarship Vice President of the PR Council of Greater Atlantic City. In addition, she has served as a mentor to public relations graduate students at her alma maters, Syracuse and Rowan universities.

“We are delighted to have Kathleen serve as our interim executive director,” said Dr. Thomas Giegerich, president of the Bay Atlantic Symphony Board of Trustees. “She brings a breadth of experience and expertise that will enhance our commitment to bringing concerts and music education to southern New Jersey.”

The Bay Atlantic Symphony performs symphonic and chamber concerts and educates adults, young people, and special populations throughout southern New Jersey in the beauty and power of classical music. To learn more, visit www.BayAtlanticSymphony.org, call (609) 449-8780, or visit them on Facebook.

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Bay Atlantic Symphony Media Contact:

Fish With Feet, LLC

Cathleen Kiernan: 609.601.8379

ckiernan@fishwithfeet.com

Bay Atlantic Symphony Recognized With a Discover Jersey Arts People’s Choice Award


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Bay Atlantic Symphony Recognized
With a Discover Jersey Arts People’s Choice Award


ATLANTIC CITY, NJ (April 10, 2019) — The Bay Atlantic Symphony was awarded the 2019 Favorite South Jersey Symphony/Orchestra Honorable Mention in the 11th Annual Discover Jersey Arts People’s Choice Awards.  The annual competition provides residents with the opportunity to vote for their favorite performing arts organizations throughout the state.

“With more than 14,000 ballots submitted, the Bay Atlantic Symphony was delighted to capture the Favorite South Jersey Symphony/Orchestra Honorable Mention. This prestigious recognition is a testament to our symphony’s continued dedication to bringing beautiful, classical music to audiences,” said Dr. Thomas Giegerich, president of the Bay Atlantic Symphony Board of Trustees.

The Bay Atlantic Symphony performs symphonic and chamber concerts and educates adults, young people, and special populations throughout southern New Jersey in the beauty and power of classical music.  To learn more, visit www.BayAtlanticSymphony.org, call (609) 449-8780, or visit them on Facebook.

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Bay Atlantic Symphony Media Contact:

Fish With Feet, LLC

Cathleen Kiernan: 609.601.8379

ckiernan@fishwithfeet.com

Bay Atlantic Symphony Presents Season Finale Concerts May 4 and 5 Featuring Violin Virtuoso and World Premiere Composition


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Bay Atlantic Symphony Presents Season Finale Concerts May 4 and 5 Featuring Violin Virtuoso and World Premiere Composition


ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (April 1, 2019) – The Bay Atlantic Symphony will conclude its 2018-19 season May 4 and 5 in concerts that revel in crisp, powerful gesture, romping fun and open expansiveness.

Featuring works by composers Samuel Barber and Ludwig van Beethoven, this season closer includes a guest appearance by young violin virtuoso Alexi Kenney performing Barber’s Violin Concerto and a world premiere work by New Jersey composer Amanda Harberg. Performances take place Saturday, May 4, at 3 p.m. in the historic Landis Theater, 830 E. Landis Avenue, Vineland, N.J.; and Sunday, May 5, at 2 p.m. in Stockton University’s Performing Arts Center, 101 Vera King Farris Dr., Galloway, N.J.

All Bay Atlantic Symphony performances will be preceded one hour prior to starting time with a “Pre-Concert Conversation with the Maestro.” Amanda Harberg will join Music Director Jed Gaylin for a special edition Pre-Concert Conversation on May 4 and 5. The Symphony’s pre- concert lectures are free and open to the public.

Tickets are available at a reduced price of $30 each, thanks to the support of Woodruff Energy and a grant through PNC Arts Alive. These concerts are also made possible through funding from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts and the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. Tickets can be purchased by calling the Landis Theater 856-691-3600 and Stockton University 609-652-9000, or online by visiting www.bayatlanticsymphony.org .

Maestro Gaylin has pulled out all the stops for this final installment of the 2018-2019 Subscription Series concerts as he treats audiences to a world premiere, an iconic concerto of American lyricism without apology performed by a poet of the violin, and Beethoven’s soaring symphony of the great outdoors.

American composer, pianist and educator Amanda Harberg was commissioned by Bay Atlantic Symphony to compose an original work for the season finale concerts. Her composition, “Dream of the Sleeping Gypsy” will be performed for the first time publicly by the Symphony’s 40 professional musicians. This world premiere performance illustrates Harberg’s distinctively personal style of weaving her deep admiration for the classical tradition together with contemporary influences.

Following Harberg’s work, young American violin virtuoso Alexi Kenney will perform Violin Concerto by another American composer, Samuel Barber (1910-1981). Described as one of the most celebrated composers of the 20th Century, Barber penned his concerto for violin and orchestra in 1939. A shimmering piece with lush, song-like passages and a finale that features a solo part in almost perpetual motion, the concerto is now among the most widely played and recorded violin concertos of the 20th century. And finally, Beethoven’s Symphony No.6, also known as the Pastoral Symphony, or Recollections of Country Life, was inspired by the famous composer’s beloved pastime of long walks in the countryside. Composed at the same time as Beethoven’s more fiery 5th Symphony, this piece takes the audience on a journey direct to the pastoral beauty of nature.

About Amanda Harberg

Amanda Harberg of Glenn Ridge, N.J., is a composer and pianist whose work communicates on emotional, spiritual and intellectual levels. With music described by the New York Times as “a sultry excursion into lyricism,”Harberg weaves her deep admiration for the classical
tradition together with contemporary influences to create a distinctively personal style.

Harberg’s works have been presented at leading institutions including Carnegie Hall,
Lincoln Center, the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society and Bargemusic. Recent commissions include works for the Philadelphia Orchestra’s Sound All Around series, the Bay Atlantic Symphony, the Dorian Wind Quintet, the Grand Rapids Symphony, the Albany
Symphony’s Dogs of Desire, the Juilliard School, the New York Youth Symphony’s First Music Programand the New Jersey Youth Symphony. Recent consortium commissions include Harberg’s Sonata for Piccolo and Piano and her Court Dances for flute and piano. Her Concerto for Viola and Orchestra was recorded on Naxos American Classics in 2017and has been performed by many orchestras around the world.

About Alexi Kenney

The recipient of a 2016 Avery Fisher Career Grant, violinist Alexi Kenney has been named "a talent to watch" by the New York Times, which also noted his "architect's eye for structure and space and a tone that ranges from the achingly fragile to full-bodied robustness.” His win at the 2013 Concert Artists Guild Competition at the age of 19 led to a critically acclaimed Carnegie Hall debut recital at Weill Hall.

Highlights of Alexi’s 2018-19 season include debuts with the Omaha Symphony, Sinfonia Gulf Coast, Asheville Symphony, Bay Atlantic Symphony, and Wheeling Symphony, and his return to the Indianapolis Symphony. He has performed as a soloist with the Detroit, Columbus, Jacksonville, Santa Fe, Portland, California, and Amarillo symphonies, and appeared in recital on Carnegie Hall’s ‘Distinctive Debuts’ series, Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival, at the Phillips Collection in Washington D.C., the Dame Myra Hess Concerts in Chicago, and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and Jordan Hall in Boston. He is winner of the 2013 Concert Artists Guild Competition and laureate of the 2012 Menuhin Competition. Alexi has been profiled by Strings magazine and the New York Times, written for The Strad, and has been featured on Performance Today, WQXR-NY’s Young Artists Showcase, WFMT- Chicago and NPR’s From the Top.

Born in Palo Alto, Calif. in 1994, Alexi holds a Bachelor of Music and Artist Diploma from the New England Conservatory in Boston, where he studied with Donald Weilerstein and Miriam Fried.


About the Bay Atlantic Symphony

The Bay Atlantic Symphony performs symphonic and chamber concerts and educates adults, young people, and special populations throughout southern New Jersey in the beauty and power of classical music. Since its founding as the Bridgeton Symphony in 1983, the orchestra has been recognized for its world-class performers, diverse programs and outstanding community services.

Under the talented baton of passionate Music Director Jed Gaylin, the Bay Atlantic Symphony is the only professional orchestra to serve the five southern-most counties of New Jersey. The Orchestra makes great music accessible through live concerts with low ticket prices at the Stockton Performing Arts Center (PAC), the historic Landis Theater in Vineland, the Avalon Symphony by the Sea Series, the Cape May Music Festival, and Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa.

The Symphony’s value to the community goes far beyond performing great music. As a cultural centerpiece, the BAS is a treasured music education resource. By creating meaningful, interactive music experiences for children, adults, the visually-impaired, veterans, and seniors with limited mobility, the BAS strives to create vibrant communities rooted in the love of music.

The New Jersey State Council on the Arts has honored Bay Atlantic Symphony with a 2017 Citation of Excellence, which denotes arts programs and projects that receive the Council’s highest possible assessment. To learn more, visit www.BayAtlanticSymphony.org , call (609) 449-8780, or visit them on Facebook.

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Bay Atlantic Symphony Media Contact: Fish With Feet, LLC
Cathleen Kiernan: 609/601.8379 ckiernan@fishwithfeet.com

Catch a bit of Brahms with your Berlioz this weekend

A hefty dose of culture is on the menu this weekend in South Jersey when the Bay Atlantic Symphony presents the music of German composer Johannes Brahms and French composer Louis-Hector Berlioz. Performances take place 3 p.m. Saturday, March 16, at the Landis Theater and 2 p.m. Sunday, March 17, at Stockton University’s Performing Arts Center. All Bay Atlantic Symphony performances will be preceded one hour prior to starting time with a pre-concert conversation with the Maestro Jed Gaylin. The pre-concert lectures are free and open to the public.

Special guest performer and Mezzo-Soprano Cecelia Hall will sing Berlioz’s Les Nuits d’été Op.7 (Summer Nights). Lending her richly-hued voice and magnetic artistry, Hall brings to life this cycle of six poems written by French poet Théophile Gautier.

The next work is by Johannes Brahms, “Symphony No. 4 in E Minor, Op. 98,” which was also the German composer’s final symphony.

Tickets are $30 each and can be purchased by calling the Landis Theater 856-691-3600 and Stockton University 609-652-9000, or online at BayAtlanticSymphony.org.

The Landis Theater is located at 830 E. Landis Avenue in Vineland. Stockton University Performing Arts Center is located at 101 Vera King Farris Drive in Galloway.

—Ryan Loughlin

BAY ATLANTIC SYMPHONY CONTRASTS BRAHMS WITH BERLIOZ

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Contrast is “the state of being strikingly different,” and it’s the perfect way to describe the two striking but very different works that the Bay Atlantic Symphony will perform at their upcoming concerts on March 16 at the historic Landis Theater in Vineland and March 17 at Stockton University Performing Arts Center in Galloway.

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Music Director Jed Gaylin will lead the orchestra in a program featuring Symphony No. 4 in E Minor, Op. 98, the final symphony by Johannes Brahms, and “Les Nuits d’été, Op.7” (“Summer Nights”), a six-poem cycle by French poet Théophile Gautier and set to music by Hector Berlioz. Guest performer mezzo-soprano Cecelia Hall will sing “Summer Nights.”

An hour prior to the start time at each performance, there will be a pre-concert conversation with the maestro. These lectures, a regular feature of Bay Atlantic Symphony concerts, are free of charge and open to the public.

When I spoke with Gaylin by phone recently, he talked enthusiastically about the compelling works on this weekend’s program and about having Hall join the orchestra to sing “Summer Nights.”

“There was a no more rigorous composer than Brahms,” Gaylin said. “He was a musical genius, and his powers of composition only grew as he got older.”

Brahms composed this symphony, his fourth and final one, when he was well into his life and yet, Gaylin believes, it is every bit as iconic as his others.

“There’s a sense of economy here, and yet it is a real examination of the complexities of life. With no words and in a most abstract way, Brahms contemplates existence and tackles the big questions.

“There is a sense of longing, of inevitable pull,” he added, “and it has an overpowering ending. It is absolutely cathartic.”

At another end of the spectrum is “Summer Nights.

“This Berlioz piece is relatively new to me,” Gayliln said, “and, although it doesn’t come around that often, it is an exquisite and completely sensual piece of music.”

The six poems-turned-songs are filled with double entendre and illusion, spirits and shadowy figures, love and loss, and journeys both cerebral and celestial.

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For example, the second poem uses the metaphor of the specter of the rose to comfort a young woman who has lost her love. “And although the narrator is male,” Gaylin said, “the voice is sensitive and intimate.”

The story goes on to portray the pain of living without a loved one and concludes with a voyage by boat, where the oarsman is a mysterious figure and the sails are made from an angel’s wing.

“It is a metaphysical trip,” said Gaylin, “with an uncertain destination. It’s very dreamy.”

As a bonus to the beautiful program, Cecelia Hall, one of today’s most established young mezzo-sopranos, will perform the Berlioz songs.

“Our former Executive Director Meg Sippey had worked with Ms. Hall before,” Gaylin said. “When I was talking about performing this piece, Sippey said ‘I think I have just the right singer for you’.”

Gaylin emphatically agrees. “I heard a clip of Hall and I knew we wanted to work with her. Her voice is just phenomenal.”

Cecelia-Hall-2.png

Touted as a singer with poise and talent that belies her age, Hall has appeared in prominent operatic roles on some of the world’s most prestigious stages, including Munich’s Bayerische Staatsoper, The Santa Fe Opera, Seattle Opera, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Canadian Opera Company, Opera Philadelphia, and Oper Frankfurt, where she is an ensemble member.

Music was an early part of Hall’s life, but singing came later. “I took piano lessons when I was six and my teacher noticed right away that I loved to sing.”

By age eight, Hall was studying both voice and piano, “about half and half,” she said, but didn’t discover her passion for opera until she was in her late teens.

“When I was younger, I had no idea I wanted to sing opera,” she said. “Then I had my first role at 19 and that did it.”

She was hooked.

“Opera is so thrilling and joyful,” said Hall, “and it’s always a love song.”

When I asked her about the upcoming performance of the Berlioz work with the Bay Atlantic Symphony, her response was effusive.

“Oh my goodness,” she said, “I have always wanted to sing these songs. There is something very special about the French sensibility.”

Originally from North Carolina, Hall currently lives in Germany – “an opera singer’s dream” – with her husband, also an opera singer, and their baby.

Although slightly off-topic, I asked Hall about the changes that have come with motherhood.

“People always talk about whether you can ‘have it all’ after becoming a parent,” she said. “I believe you can have the things that are most important to you.

“My music and my family are most important to me now, and since our child was born, I have a deeper sense of gratitude when I’m on stage. It’s such a gift.”

In addition to their concerts during the season – which conclude in May with a program featuring the Barber Violin Concerto, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6, and a World Premiere composer Amanda Harberg – the Symphony is strongly committed to providing outside-the-concert-hall experiences at alternate venues like the Symphony by the Sea series at the Avalon Free Public Library, as part of the Cape May Music Festival, and at the Borgata Hotel and Casino, to name a few.

The Symphony’s outreach efforts extend to young people as well.

“We have a very robust education program,” Gaylin said, “that offers fantastic opportunities for students to participate in mentorship programs with our professional musicians,” he said, “And in May, we present several Young People’s Concerts that draw over 2,000 people.”

Gaylin also pointed out that Amanda Harberg, who composed the piece being premiered at the BAS season finale concerts, will be debuting that new work, “Sleeping Gypsy,” at the Young People’s Concert in Vineland.

“Harberg lives in New Jersey, which is great,” he said, “and not only will she play this new piece, but she’ll also be talking with the kids about her work and her process.

“She is a very approachable composer.”

Approachable. Accessible. Far-reaching.

For me, words such as these describe what it a musical organization like the Bay Atlantic Symphony does well. And my conversations with Gaylin and Hall further clarified the idea that music is a powerful resource to be shared as widely as possible.

Gaylin expounded on this.

“I believe that great art captures the range of human experience and touches us to our core,” he said. “This is true for performances, but perhaps even more accurate when we talk about what it means to expose young people to music.

“Whenever I come away from working with middle-schoolers, for example,” he said, “I feel genuinely inspired.”

“In my mind, music education is much more than just teaching a child to play an instrument. It is helping them discover a voice for their souls.”

MEDIA ADVISORY - BAS Performs PETER AND THE WOLF

**MEDIA ADVISORY**MEDIA ADVISORY**
BAY ATLANTIC SYMPHONY PERFORMS A SCHOOL CHILDREN’S CONCERT: PETER AND THE WOLF
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

WHO:

The Schultz-Hill Foundation has commissioned Bay Atlantic Symphony to perform a free music education concert program for Atlantic County school students from Principle Academy Charter School and Our Lady Star of the Sea Elementary School.

WHAT:

Under the direction of Bay Atlantic Symphony’s music director and maestro Jed Gaylin, the orchestra will perform a much beloved youth music education program featuring Peter and the Wolf, a symphonic fairytale for children.

Written by composer Sergei Prokofiev in 1936 in the Soviet Union, Peter and the Wolf is a children's story(with both music and text by Prokofiev), spoken by a narrator. It introduces audiences (especially school age students) to the sounds and sections of the symphony. The fairytale tells
the story of a young Russian boy who lives in the woods and skillfully traps a wolf which has been terrorizing him and his animal friends. The instruments in the Orchestra represent each of the characters of the story, for ex., the French Horn is the Wolf; the Bassoon is Peter’s grandfather, etc.

Serving as the fairytale’s on-stage, live narrator is 25-year old Stockton University theater performance major Ryan Gorman. Hailing from Belvidere, N.J., Gorman is both an actor and director at Stockton University.

Several days prior to the performance, the student audience will receive a curriculum guide/primer designed to familiarize them with the performance and allow each student to get the most from this arts education opportunity.

A “Question and Answer” session between the students and Maestro Jed Gaylin will be part of the program.

WHEN/WHERE:

Wednesday, March 13, 2019, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Dante Hall Theater
14 N. Mississippi Avenue Atlantic City, NJ 08401

WHY:

The Schultz-Hill Foundation is providing area school children with the opportunity to experience a fine arts performance as part of the foundation’s mission to promote and support education, history and the arts in South Jersey. By commissioning Bay Atlantic Symphony, which implements similar arts education initiatives, area students will benefit from attending a

1616 Pacific Ave.
Suite 308
Atlantic City, NJ 08401 609-449-8780 info@bayatlanticsymphony.org

live orchestra performance and learning how life experiences and storytelling is expressed in the fine arts.

MEDIA IS ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND

MEDIA CONTACT:

Bay Atlantic Symphony PR Rep:

FISH WITH FEET, LLC Cathleen Kiernan ckiernan@fishwithfeet.com mobile/text: 609-705-0601

BAY ATLANTIC SYMPHONY PRESENTS BRAHMS AND BERLIOZ WITH SPECIAL GUEST CECELIA HALL AT LANDIS THEATER

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Prepare your ears to be dazzled by the light and dark—chiaroscuro—transfigure that is Brahms and Berlioz featuring Cecelia Hall presented by The Landis Theater. This esteemed concert of optimal contrast will include a performance of music from German composer Johannes Brahms and French composer Louis-Hector Berlioz by The Bay Atlantic Symphony. Director, Jed Gaylin, will lead The Bay Atlantic Symphony with the addition of vocals by Cecelia Hall.

The Bay Atlantic Symphony performs symphonic and chamber concerts throughout southern New Jersey. Founded in 1983 as the Bridgeton Symphony, the orchestra now has been acknowledged for its world-class performers, diverse programs and outstanding community services. They have combined their music with Cecelia Hall’s richly-hued voice to create a one of a kind concert experience.

Hall is one of the most established young mezzo-soprano vocalists of our time. She will be singing Berlioz’s Les Nuits d’été, Op.7 (Summer Nights). Her majestic vocals will bring the series of six poems written by French poet, Théophile Gautier, to life. The poems were originally framed to music by Berlioz between 1843 and 1856. At first, the poems went unacknowledged; however, by the 1900s, Summer Nights became one of his most famous works.

Berlioz— Les Nuits d’été (Summer Nights)
Cecelia Hall, mezzo-soprano
Brahms—Symphony No. 4

The concert will take place on Saturday, March 16, 2019, at 3:00 p.m. at the Landis Theater, located at 830 E. Landis Avenue Vineland, New Jersey 08360. Pre-Concert Conversation with Music Director Jed Gaylin will begin at 2 pm.

Tickets are $30.00, Students with ID are $10.00. Click here to purchase your tickets today to reserve the best seats in the house! Call 856-691-3600 for more information.

We are also giving two (2) lucky participants two (2) free tickets each to the concert!  From now until March 14th, you can enter in our very own giveaway!  Entries can be placed here.

2019 OFFICERS ELECTED TO BAY ATLANTIC SYMPHONY BOARD OF TRUSTEES


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

2019 OFFICERS ELECTED TO BAY ATLANTIC SYMPHONY BOARD OF TRUSTEES


ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (March 6, 2019) — Bay Atlantic Symphony is proud to announce three very accomplished Board of Trustees to its leadership to start the new year. Avid and longtime BAS supporter, Thomas A. Giegerich DMD, MS is the newly-appointed President; Robert Woodruff, former BAS President (2009-2013), will serve as Treasurer; and the esteemed Dana Dunn Lisicki will serve as Secretary for the 2019 calendar year.

“As a fourth generation Atlantic City area native and someone who has travelled extensively, I hold the Bay Atlantic Symphony to the standards of excellence that I have experienced in my travels. I can say without hesitation that it is one of the finest symphonies in the world, and I look forward to moving forward its mission ‘to make transcendent live music accessible and available in southern New Jersey and thereby improve [lives],’”stated Dr. Giegerich.

A local, a high school athlete, a doctor, a veteran, a successful businessman and a sailor, Giegerich has lived many lives and successfully fulfilled many roles. After leaving Holy Spirit High School as Senior Class President, he honed his leadership skills while at Rutgers University New Brunswick in academics and athletics, parlaying his academic success into a rank 10/120 and a DMD degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine before serving in the US Air Force as Captain for three years. His Orthodontic residency in Cleveland at Case Western Reserve University landed him a second home where he practiced for 29 years.

After returning home to Margate in 2000, Giegerich made several investment purchases including many sailing vessels varying in size from a 46 ft. Sailing Ketch Osprey to a 192 ft. cargo vessel eventually sailing from Key West to Canada and back as well as multiple transatlantic passenger voyages. He eventually returned to part-time practice in Galloway in 2010 and now focuses his spare time on the symphony, his three sons and seven grandchildren.

Bob Woodruff has been a member and supporter of the Bay Atlantic Symphony for all of its 30 years, serving as a board member and philanthropist to the organization. His company, Woodruff Energy, has provided access to affordable tickets for the general public further advancing the BAS mission.

An Accounting graduate of the University of Delaware, longtime resident of Alloway, Salem County and husband to Merry for 56 years, Woodruff has made his mark in his family company since 1958 and currently serves as a Senior Vice President. His other offices have included President, NJ State Board of Education (1996-1998), President of the NJ Fuel Merchants of NJ (1980-82), member of NJ Supreme Court District #1 Ethics Commission (2007-2010), member and past president of the Bridgeton Rotary Club; 30- year member and Chair of the Alloway Township Planning Board; and past president of the Bridgeton Area United Way.

Woodruff says, “It is an honor to continue on with the Bay Atlantic Symphony in a new leadership capacity and to watch this genre of music reach future generations of classical music aficionados.”

Dana Dunn Lisicki is used to growing organizations to serve local citizens. In her role as Market Development Administrator for a regional healthcare system, she has built a team of providers necessary to care for the residents of Atlantic County and beyond. Residing in Upper Twp., Cape May County, Lisicki was educated at Temple University and holds an MBA in Health Administration from Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science. She is uniquely attuned to community outreach to all past, present and future constituents of the Bay Atlantic Symphony.

“I look forward to my role with the Bay Atlantic Symphony and to lending my expertise to the organization as well as growing with it,” said Dunn Lisicki.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Full biographies and headshots are available by visiting https://bayatlanticsymphony.org/board/


About the Bay Atlantic Symphony

The Bay Atlantic Symphony performs symphonic and chamber concerts and educates adults, young people, and special populations throughout southern New Jersey in the beauty and power of classical music.

Since its founding as the Bridgeton Symphony in 1983, the orchestra has been recognized for its world-class performers, diverse programs and outstanding community services. Under the talented baton of passionate Music Director Jed Gaylin, the Bay Atlantic Symphony is the only professional orchestra to serve the five southern-most counties of New Jersey. The Orchestra makes great music accessible through live concerts with low ticket prices at the Stockton Performing Arts Center (PAC), the historic Landis Theater in Vineland, the Avalon Symphony by the Sea Series, the Cape May Music Festival, and Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa.

The Symphony’s value to the community goes far beyond performing great music. As a cultural centerpiece, the BAS is a treasured music education resource. By creating meaningful, interactive music experiences for children, adults, the visually-impaired, veterans, and seniors with limited mobility, the BAS strives to create vibrant communities rooted in the love of music. The New Jersey State Council on the Arts has honored Bay Atlantic Symphony with a 2017 Citation of Excellence, which denotes arts programs and projects that receive the Council’s highest possible assessment. To learn more, visit www.BayAtlanticSymphony.org, call (609) 449-8780, or visit them on Facebook.

BAY ATLANTIC SYMPHONY RECEIVES GRANT AND CITATION OF EXCELLENCE FROM NEW JERSEY STATE COUNCIL ON THE ARTS


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

BAY ATLANTIC SYMPHONY RECEIVES GRANT AND CITATION OF EXCELLENCE
FROM NEW JERSEY STATE COUNCIL ON THE ARTS


ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (February 15, 2019)The Bay Atlantic Symphony is once again honored to be recognized by a committee of its peers, the New Jersey State Council on The Arts, with a Citation of Excellence and a generous grant for operations support for fiscal year 2019. The State Council’s Citation of Excellence denotes arts programs and projects that receive the Council’s highest possible assessment based on grant applications. The Citation recognizes arts organizations, programs, and projects that showcase the highest degree of artistic quality, programming, and public service in the arts.    

 

The New Jersey State Council on the Arts awarded more than $15.7 million in grant funding to support 700 arts organizations, projects, and artists throughout the state in July of 2018. The awards were announced at the Arts Council's 52nd Annual Meeting held at the New Jersey State Museum in Trenton.  Bay Atlantic Symphony received a grant in the amount of $40,379 for general operations support. 

 

Of the 700 organizations, projects and individual artists receiving grant support, only 46 organizations or  projects received the highest evaluations and were honored with Citation of Excellence, with Bay Atlantic Symphony among them.  

 

“The arts challenge us to be creative and learn new skills, all of which help keep the mind astute and boost confidence. We congratulate and remain extremely grateful to today's award winners for their contribution and dedication to preserving a vital resource in their communities that directly improves the quality of life for everyone,” stated New Jersey Secretary of State Tahesha Way.

 

Last year, Council grantees spent $275 million in New Jersey; employed an estimated 25,000 workers; and attracted nearly 7.5 million patrons who spent an additional $232 million in the state. New Jersey artists and arts organizations produced one dollar of local economic activity for every three cents in grant funding received from the State Arts Council.


About the Bay Atlantic Symphony

“Our 2019 Citation of Excellence Award marks the third time Bay Atlantic Symphony has been honored with this distinction,” stated Tom Giegerich, president of Bay Atlantic Symphony’s Board of Trustees.  “For more than 30 years the symphony has been dedicated to bringing the immense beauty and inspiration of classical music to South Jersey residents through concerts, music education, and life enrichment programs. It is gratifying to have this work recognized by a committee of our peers at the highest level,” he added. 

 

About the Bay Atlantic Symphony
The Bay Atlantic Symphony performs symphonic and chamber concerts and educates adults, young people, and special populations throughout southern New Jersey in the beauty and power of classical music.

 

Since its founding as the Bridgeton Symphony in 1983, the orchestra has been recognized for its world-class performers, diverse programs and outstanding community services. Under the talented baton of passionate Music Director Jed Gaylin, the Bay Atlantic Symphony is the only professional orchestra to serve the five southern-most counties of New Jersey. The Orchestra makes great music accessible through live concerts with low ticket prices at the Stockton Performing Arts Center (PAC), the historic Landis Theater in Vineland, the Avalon Symphony by the Sea Series, the Cape May Music Festival, and Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa.

 

The Symphony’s value to the community goes far beyond performing great music. As a cultural centerpiece, the BAS is a treasured music education resource. By creating meaningful, interactive music experiences for children, adults, the visually-impaired, veterans, and seniors with limited mobility, the BAS strives to create vibrant communities rooted in the love of music.  The New Jersey State Council on the Arts has honored Bay Atlantic Symphony with a 2019 Citation of Excellence, which denotes arts programs and projects that receive the Council’s highest possible assessment. To learn more, visit www.BayAtlanticSymphony.org, call (609) 449-8780, or visit them on Facebook.

###

Bay Atlantic Symphony Media Contact:

Fish With Feet, LLC
Cathleen Kiernan: 609/601.8379
ckiernan@fishwithfeet.com

Bay Atlantic Symphony Presents Brahms & Berlioz Featuring Mezzo-Soprano Cecelia Hall March 16 and 17


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Bay Atlantic Symphony Presents Brahms & Berlioz
Featuring Mezzo-Soprano Cecelia Hall March 16 and 17
A Concert of Ultimate Contrasts, Light and Dark, Punctuates the Symphony’s March Performance


ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (January 29, 2019) – The Bay Atlantic Symphony presents a dramatic performance of ultimate contrasts for its March concerts featuring the music of German composer Johannes Brahms and French composer Louis-Hector Berlioz.  Performances take place Saturday, March 16 at 3 p.m. in the historic Landis Theater, 830 E. Landis Avenue, Vineland, N.J.; and Sunday, March 17 at 2 p.m. in Stockton University’s Performing Arts Center, 101 Vera King Farris Dr., Galloway, N.J. All Bay Atlantic Symphony performances will be preceded one hour prior to starting time with a “Pre-Concert Conversation with the Maestro.” The Symphony’s pre-concert lectures are free and open to the public.  

Tickets are available at a reduced price of $30 each, thanks to the generous support of Woodruff Energy, and a grant through PNC Arts Alive. These concerts are also made possible through funding from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts and the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. Tickets can be purchased by calling the Landis Theater 856-691-3600 and Stockton University 609-652-9000, or online by visiting www.bayatlanticsymphony.org .

Under the baton of Bay Atlantic Symphony Music Director Jed Gaylin, special guest performer and Mezzo-Soprano Cecelia Hall will sing Berlioz’s Les Nuits d’été, Op.7 (Summer Nights). Lending her richly-hued voice and magnetic artistry, Hall brings to life this cycle of six poems written by French poet Théophile Gautier.  The poems were originally composed to music by Berlioz between 1843 and 1856, and while initially going unrecognized, by the 20th Century Summer Nights became, and still is, one of Berlioz’s most popular works.

The contrast unfolds as the next work by Johannes Brahms, Symphony No. 4 in E Minor, Op. 98, also the German composer’s final symphony, miraculously deepens with each tone and yet simultaneously somehow shimmers with almost piercing luminosity. The conclusion of the work is one of the most shattering movements in all of music.

About Cecilia Hall
American Cecelia Hall is one of today’s most established young mezzo-sopranos. Hailed by the Financial Times for her “easy flexibility, arresting poise and enveloping warmth,” she has appeared since 2014 in leading roles at many of the world’s finest stages, including Munich’s Bayerische Staatsoper, The Santa Fe Opera, Seattle Opera, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Canadian Opera Company, Opera Philadelphia, and Oper Frankfurt, where she is a member of the ensemble.

An alumna of the Metropolitan Opera’s Lindemann Young Artist Development Program and the Lyric Opera of Chicago’s Ryan Opera Center, Ms. Hall made debuts with the Seattle Opera as Wellgunde and Rossweisse in their 2013 Ring des Nibelungen and with the Fort Worth Opera as the Komponist in Ariadne auf Naxos (a role she previously sang with the Palau de les Arts in Valencia, Spain and at the Tanglewood Music Festival).

Ms. Hall received much critical acclaim for her performance in the title role of Handel’s Teseo at Chicago Opera Theater, and she has also debuted at the Metropolitan Opera as the Second Priestess in Iphigénie en Tauride. A noted recitalist, Cecelia Hall has appeared several times at Carnegie Hall, both with the Horne Foundation and with Carnegie’s Ensemble ACJW. As a Samling Artist, she sang in recital at Wigmore Hall.

An alumna of the Juilliard School and DePaul University, Ms. Hall is a recipient of a 2011 Sara Tucker Study Grant, a 2012 Brian Dickie Outstanding Young Singer Award, the 2013 Lynne Harvey Foundation Scholarship from the Musician’s Club of Women, Third Prize from the 2013 Gerda Lissner Foundation, and the 2015 winner of the Norma Newton Award from the George London Foundation.


About the Bay Atlantic Symphony

The Bay Atlantic Symphony performs symphonic and chamber concerts and educates adults, young people, and special populations throughout southern New Jersey in the beauty and power of classical music. Since its founding as the Bridgeton Symphony in 1983, the orchestra has been recognized for its world-class performers, diverse programs and outstanding community services.

Under the talented baton of passionate Music Director Jed Gaylin, the Bay Atlantic Symphony is the only professional orchestra to serve the five southern-most counties of New Jersey. The Orchestra makes great music accessible through live concerts with low ticket prices at the Stockton Performing Arts Center (PAC), the historic Landis Theater in Vineland, the Avalon Symphony by the Sea Series, the Cape May Music Festival, and Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa.

The Symphony’s value to the community goes far beyond performing great music. As a cultural centerpiece, the BAS is a treasured music education resource. By creating meaningful, interactive music experiences for children, adults, the visually-impaired, veterans, and seniors with limited mobility, the BAS strives to create vibrant communities rooted in the love of music.

The New Jersey State Council on the Arts has honored Bay Atlantic Symphony with a 2017 Citation of Excellence, which denotes arts programs and projects that receive the Council’s highest possible assessment. To learn more, visit www.BayAtlanticSymphony.org , call (609) 449-8780, or visit them on Facebook.

###

Bay Atlantic Symphony Media Contact: Fish With Feet, LLC
Cathleen Kiernan: 609/601.8379 ckiernan@fishwithfeet.com

Mozart, Finzi and Verdi - oh my!

The Bay Atlantic Symphony will perform at the Landis Theater and Stockton’s PAC.

The Bay Atlantic Symphony will perform at the Landis Theater and Stockton’s PAC.

Lovers of beautiful classical music are in for a treat this week as pianist Juho Pohjonen will join the Bay Atlantic Symphony, conducted by Music Director Jed Gaylin, for two performances that will not be forgotten.

Audiences can prepare to revel in Mozart’s Adagio and Fugue as well as in Pohjonen’s passionate interpretation of Piano Concerto No. 23, K.488, A Major. Next, listeners will experience Finzi’s bittersweet and soaring Romance, followed by Verdi’s Symphony for Strings, E minor.

The performances will be at 3 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 19, at the historic Landis Theater in Vineland; and 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 20, at Stockton University’s Performing Arts Center. All Bay Atlantic Symphony performances will be preceded one hour prior to starting time with a “Pre-Concert Conversation with the Maestro.” The Symphony’s pre-concert lectures are free and open to the public.

The Landis Theater is located at 830 E. Landis Avenue, Vineland. Stockton University’s PAC is located at 101 Vera King Farris Drive in Galloway. Go to Bay Atlantic Symphony.org for more info.

— Ryan Loughlin


Miss America, children's choir joins Bay Atlantic Symphony for holiday concert

The Bay Atlantic Symphony will bring cheer and joy with two performances of their annual holiday concert.

"This is one of our concerts that lifts people's spirits," said music director and concert Maestro Jed Gaylin ""It's a delightful and heartwarming program".

The holiday concert is a mainstay of the Bay Atlantic Symphony's season featuring a number of traditional holiday songs and Baroque-style selections.

The orchestra will perform Saturday at the Landis Theater in Vineland and a sold out show Sunday at Stockton University's Campus Center Theater.

A newly arranged Hanukkah medley, featuring eight songs orchestrated together by a selected composer.

Gaylin said his favorite part of the show involves the children's choir which joins the musician to lead the audience in two carol sing-alongs.

As a child, Gaylin said he often arranged door-to-door caroling in his neighborhood, so to give area students in the choir a chance to sing holiday classics makes it a special event.

The children's choir is comprise of 20 to 40 kids, with ages ranging from 7 to high school age. More impressive is that the choir gets one chance to practice with the full symphony before taking the stage. "I tell the kids, this concert is to make people feel cheerful about the holidays, so have fun!” said Gaylin.

Also returning to join the orchestra, Miss America 2019 Nia Franklin. Franklin previously sang at the Bay Atlantic Symphony's gala in September. "We usually have a opera singer and we've established a good relationship with Nia," said Gaylin.

Franklin is a classically trained opera singer, studied music composition at East Carolina University and has a master’s degree in music composition from the North Carolina School of the Arts. For the holiday concerts, Franklin will perform "O Holy Night" and the Bach arrangement of "Ave Maria".

“I am eager to perform alongside a beautiful and special group of musicians who value arts education," Franklin said in a statement. "The Bay Atlantic Symphony is doing great work by promoting two concerts, which are focusing on community engagement in their music. I feel very fortunate to have been asked to join their holiday concert series.”

For more information, visit www.bayatlanticsymphony.org


Why Jason Alexander of ‘Seinfeld’ refuses to answer to ‘George’ in public

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When actor Jason Alexander pairs with the Bay Atlantic Symphony at the Borgata in Atlantic City this weekend for his one-man show, "As Long As You're Asking — A Conversation with Jason Alexander," he won't focus on his time as George on Seinfeld. Instead, the Jersey-born Alexander will concentrate on singing songs from his career's start on Broadway, which includes roles in the original cast of the Hal Prince/Stephen Sondheim musical Merrily We Roll Along, Kander and Ebb's The Rink, Neil Simon's Broadway Bound, and his Tony Award-winning performance in Jerome Robbins' Broadway.

What made you think as a kid that you might want to be a magician … and then get out of magic when acting came calling?

What made me want to get in – and this is typical of many magicians – is that I was this geeky, shy kid enamored of magic and had a lot of alone time. I was a little overwhelmed by the world. I think the notion of being able to do these little seemingly miraculous things felt powerful. If I could do something amazing with my hands, I wouldn't have to speak, not really show my personality. I could just let the trick be me. I started really loving it, and getting into it – and then I got out of it, because I had a deep and abiding love of, and respect for, the craft of magic. I realized I wouldn't be good enough, especially considering that I wanted to be a close-up magician, to be able to do things in my hands. But my hands were – still are – small with short fingers that aren't great for cards or coin tricks. About the same time as I was getting out of that, age 13, I began hanging with the theater kids and going to shows.  I had just moved from one town in Jersey to another when I got onstage, as a Von Trapp child in The Sound of Music. … I realized there that theater was a great illusion, and perhaps I was better suited to that.

I like that you call theater an illusion. In one of his autobiographies, Stephen Sondheim mentions how you, above any actor he's worked with, played a middle-aged man best. You sing Sondheim in the show you're doing at the Borgata. You directed his Sunday in the Park with George. What does Sondheim mean to you?

Steve was among a handful of giants who made me want to do this. I talk about this in my symphony show, discovering the music of theater through my sister who had an enormous Broadway record collection. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the ForumCompanyWest Side Story. … Working with him was so overwhelming that I almost missed it. I was 20, he couldn't have been nicer, more generous or gracious, and yet, I quaked in my shoes whenever I got within 10 feet of him. It was also not lost on me that I would be singing his songs in this role for the first time, that I would be its originator, and it's like being anointed, knighted even.

You also originated a role in Neil Simon's Broadway Bound, and worked closely with the comic playwright. 

He was amazing. I knew my first audition for that play was about as good as anything I would ever do. When they called, I thought they did so to offer me the part – that's how good I was. No. They asked to see me again. I couldn't find what they wanted me to improve. When I finally got the part, Neil told me, "We had to make sure it wasn't a fluke." … He even wrote me a note on opening night: "If I didn't have Danny, I'd want you as a brother." I had only the best of Neil.

The Seinfeld thing. You have worked with Larry David within the last decade — onstage with Fish in the Dark, on HBO's Curb Your Enthusiasm. What is the relation like with him, since you played a version of him as George? Or the rest of the cast for that matter?

It's so hard to describe to people outside the experience. They get disappointed when I tell them that we are the best of work friends, and that that experience lasted so long, and was so intense and honest – we adored being with each other – yet we had no history of being social friends. The workday would end, and we were off and away from each other. Go to our separate corners, especially when they show ended. That said, if any one of us calls the other – and I can't tell you how many times I've called Jerry for endorsements and personal appearances, and he's there, which is the same for Larry, Michael, and Julia – we're golden. It's a wonderful relationship and we can re-create that affection at the drop of a hat.

Is there one Seinfeld thing that people yell at you, or catcall, that you're actually pleased to hear?

I don't mind any of it, to tell you the truth. I know that even the can't-stand-yous are hurled at me with some degree of affection. The only thing is, if you yell 'George,' at me in a public place, I probably won't acknowledge it – not because I'm offended – but because, on many occasions, I have cavalierly turned to acknowledge my praise and kinship, only to find that that same person is calling out to someone actually named George. So, yes, I have been embarrassed many times.

Miss America Nia Franklin Sings National Anthem to Open Bay Atlantic Symphony's Gala Concert

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. - Newly crowned Miss America 2019 and advocate for education in the arts Nia Franklin will sing the National Anthem at the opening of Bay Atlantic Symphony’s 11th Annual Gala Concert featuring: An Evening with Jason Alexander.

Scheduled for Saturday, September 29th, at 8 p.m. in the Borgata Casino Hotel and Spa’s Music Box Theater, the Gala Concert serves as the Symphony’s largest fundraiser of the year.

“We are thrilled to welcome special guest performer Miss America 2019 Nia Franklin to the stage for our annual gala concert,” stated music director for Bay Atlantic Symphony Jed Gaylin.

“As an accomplished composer of music and performer, Nia’s Miss America Social Impact Initiative of Advocating for the Arts, brings renewed energy and lends an important voice to the mission we work so hard to promote as a community symphony orchestra — which is to share the beauty, power and value of classical music with successive generations.

In addition to singing the National Anthem at the opening of the concert, Miss America will briefly address ticket holders and sponsors of the Gala’s VIP pre- concert dinner about the importance of continued support for arts education.

Now in its eleventh year, the Symphony’s Gala concert event serves as a critical annual fundraiser in support of Bay Atlantic’s dynamic music education programs and community outreach initiatives. Proceeds from event fund the orchestra’s free music education programs throughout the year for South Jersey’s school children, veterans and disabled populations.

Concert tickets are $79 per person. VIP tickets that include a pre-concert (black- tie optional) dinner at Borgata, preferred theater seating, and a post-concert cocktail and dessert reception are $199 per person. VIP Plus tickets are $349 each and include all VIP benefits plus an exclusive meet-and-greet with Jason Alexander after the performance.

To purchase a $79 concert ticket, call Borgata Box Office at 866-900-4849. For VIP, VIP Plus or discounted group sale tickets of 10 more, call the Bay Atlantic Symphony directly at 609-449-8780 or visit bayatlanticsymphony.org.

Why Should I Come to the Symphony?

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A couple of years ago, a Bay Atlantic Symphony board member was attending our final subscription concert of the year at the Stockton Performing Arts Center. She was sitting next to a Stockton student.

Our board member noticed the student was both transfixed, and also in tears. She asked the student if everything was OK.

The student had no idea her neighbor was associated with the orchestra. Her response was, “I just did not ever expect it could be so beautiful.”

Our concerts offer a transformative experience, an evening or afternoon that may well remain in your memory and consciousness forever. Much of this music was written with this idea in mind, that you would leave having an emotional truth uncovered, a powerful statement brought home about our place on the planet.

Perhaps it is for this reason, in addition to our education and community outreach, that I have so often heard the symphony called a rare treasure for the people of Cape May County.

In Avalon, this August, the response to Beethoven Symphony No. 5 and Mozart’s Second Flute concerto was over the top. Words like “riveted,” “transfixed,” and “goose bumps” were used by people throughout the Avalon audience for this music that has spoken to so many, so personally, over continents and hundreds of years.

This music reaches beyond entertainment. It is one experience to hear a five-minute catchy tune or a figure that reminds you of a scene, era, or moment in life. It is another to listen to a piece that works on your emotions and senses over the timespan of 30 or more minutes.

A great symphony will take you on an emotional odyssey, with ups and downs. By the time the final triumphant melody bursts forth in Beethoven’s 5th Symphony, as just an instance, we have collectively been through powerful musical ideas and emotional states that form a whole narrative with incredible impact.

Why should I come to the symphony? Those 30 minutes or more of sustained musical experience are acutely craved in today’s distracted world.

Cell phones are turned off, the hall is dark, and we have the chance to tend our individual souls through the senses; yet, we do so collectively as an audience. After all, we could just plug into our solipsistic gizmos, go on YouTube, and hear any great symphony desired. But, the act of coming together as a community to share this live moment is powerful.

It is why we visit with friends and don’t just call, why people go to houses of worship, why we are so happy to have children come home to see us.

Bay Atlantic Symphony concerts are performed within our communities, in relatively intimate halls (125 - 900 seats). With these proximities, the presence of the orchestra is powerful for the audience, and reciprocally the orchestra keenly senses the audience.

In a live performance, the exhilaration on stage comes from interacting with the attention and engagement from the audience. We respond subconsciously and instantaneously to that emotional state in the room.

Performers feel most alive when this shared music takes on a life of its own on that day, in a very specific and uncharted way. In this sense, you are part of the act of creation when you come to a live performance.

Afterward, the next day, members of the community, whether it is the Borough of Avalon after a concert at the free public library or after a Cape May music festival concert, share their feelings with each other. We establish a deep bond, wordless in its way, even though spoken about, that cements a community and gives us empathy for our fellow human beings.

What could be more powerful, more thrilling, and more worthwhile? Come hear and see for yourself, we look forward to meeting you.

Jed Gaylin is music director of Bay Atlantic Symphony and artist in residence at Stockton University. He also serves as music director of Johns Hopkins Symphony Orchestra and music director of Two Rivers Chamber Orchestra in West Virginia.